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  29.08.2020, 19:00h


Bat Night: In 2020, bats need our protection more than ever

International Bat Night has been celebrated since 1997 under the auspices of the Agreement on the Protection of European Bat Populations - EUROBATS, of which Croatia is a member.

Through the Bat Night event, with the slogan Give more for bats / I am a bat, not bad, the Krka National Park is trying point out the biological importance of theses only flying mammals and in this manner negate the prejudices that have been tied to bats ever since the Irish writer Bram Stocker published in 1897 his famous horror novel Dracula, about a vampire that could transform himself into a bat. International Bat Night has been celebrated since 1997 under the auspices of the Agreement on the Protection of European Bat Populations - EUROBATS, of which Croatia is a member.

This year we will celebrate Bat Night "upside-down" - during the day. Due to the epidemiological situation, instead of an all-night event in Skradin, on Friday, 4 September, from 10 am to 5 pm, a "Bat Point" will be set up at Skradinski buk waterfall, where visitors will be educated about this species, and old workshops by new measures on social distance.

Even before Stocker's novel, bats had a terrifying role in legends, fairy tales, and folk tales, which created numerous prejudices against them. Their wings are an indispensable ingredient of magic potions, and the unfounded assumptions that bats drink blood and get caught in people’s hair have led to people destroying their habitats. Today bats are one of the most endangered animal groups in the world. Unfortunately, this year bats were further stigmatized as the first vector of COVID-19 infection to humans.

Bats are an important part of world ecosystems and are indicators of a healthy environment. The importance of bats in nature is manifested in the biological control of the number of insects, along with pollination and spread of plant seeds. 

Here you can watch the video on the official EUROBATS website. It was the CMS Convention on Migratory Species, the EUROBATS Agreement on the Protection of European Bat Populations and the AEWA Agreement on the Protection of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds on Bats and COVID-19 Diseases that sent a letter indicating that bats do not transmit COVID-19 but the disease is transmitted from person to person. Also, there is no evidence that the SARS-COV-2 virus was initially transmitted directly from bats to humans. Scientific research is still being conducted to determine from which source and through which mediators the virus was transmitted to humans. The reason for this reaction from the international level is the sad fact that in some parts of the world bat killing is happening, as an unjustified measure to combat the epidemic.

Bats, despite their positive role in nature, are an extremely vulnerable group of animals. In the last fifty years, total number of bat species has declined by 20% and 25% are endangered. In Croatia, there are 35 species of bats. Seventeen of them have been noted in the Krka National Park, which is 48.6% of the total number of bats recorded in Croatia.